Lifter of My Head (Psalm 3) [free song]

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Text by Dan Totten; Tune by Jean Sibelius

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LIFTER OF MY HEAD (PSALM 3)

(Text by Dan Totten; Tune by Jean Sibelius)

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Psalm 3: 1-3
O LORD, my foes have risen up against me,
Proclaiming that there is no help in God.
But this I know:  You are a Shield about me,
My Glory, and the Lifter of my head.
But this I know:  You are a Shield about me,
My Glory, and the Lifter of my head.

Psalm 3: 4-6
I cry aloud to God who is Salvation.
I hear Him answer from His holy hill.
I sleep in peace, for God the LORD sustains me;
I will not fear, though thousands would assail.
I sleep in peace, for God the LORD sustains me;
I will not fear, though thousands would assail.

Psalm 3: 7-8
Arise, O LORD, my God Who does deliver;
Strike down my enemies as in the past,
For unto You, O LORD, belongs salvation.
May blessing on Your people ever rest.
For unto You, O LORD, belongs salvation.
May blessing on Your people ever rest.

Isaiah 53:3; I Peter 3:18; 4:1,19
The Son of Man, rejected and forsaken,
Suffered unjustly at the hands of men.
So let us arm ourselves with this same purpose—
Embrace His will, entrust our souls to Him.
So let us arm ourselves with this same purpose—
Embrace His will, entrust our souls to Him.

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DOCTRINAL NOTES

(by Dan Totten)

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Because God delights in worship that is biblical, thoughtful and fervent—what we often call intentional—please consider the following overview of the biblical texts and theological themes behind “Lifter of My Head (Psalm 3)”:

The first three verses of this musical adaptation of Psalm 3 express both the emotional anguish and the triumphant faith of King David as he fled his son Absalom, an event recounted in 2 Samuel 15. The final verse is intended to draw two parallels. First, it is intended to draw a parallel between the experience of David and that of Christ. Secondly, it is intended to draw a parallel between the experience of Christ and the potential experience of believers.